Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl

Audible version, read by Helena Bonham Carter

I visited Anne Frank’s House in Amsterdam back in 2011, the first time I came to Europe, and had been meaning to read the book since. I finally did, thanks to audio book. I listened to the 70th anniversary edition above, read by Helena Bonham Carter, and it was perfect. I really liked her reading.

As a side note, I recently just got into a series of audio books through audible. I tried listening to audio books in the past but but couldn’t get into it. This time I found a way that works for me, which is listening while reading the actual paper book. Might sound a bit odd for a lot of you, but for me I feel like I miss too much with just listening, and listening the words being spoken while reading makes the reading more interesting and lively. I don’t this for every book, but it worked great for this book. And because this book is a series of diary entries that are not too dense, I wasn’t too strict about the listening and reading combo, and sometimes just continued listening while walking.

Anyway it was a long winded way for me to say that this audio book was the perfect way to “read” it. Though I loved many aspects of the book, it is after all a diary of a young girl (Anne Frank was 13-15 years old at the time of writing), and I can see how reading diary entries of a young girl could be… tiresome? I myself wrote diary when I was her age, in a style that is not unlike her. In fact the diary reminded me so much of my own, that at times I was embarrassed for both of us, especially on subjects like boys, and all the assertions to be independent from our parents. Funny how a lot of young girls are alike, no matter where you are and which culture you are born into.

Obviously the similarities ended there, as Anne Frank’s circumstances were so extraordinary. The diary spans more than two years living in hiding, in such close confined space, with the same eight people. I can’t imagine it. On top of that she was at the age in which you begin to yearn exploring the world outside your home, to be independent away from your immediate family. Instead you are forced to be living 24/7 under the adults. How frustrating it must’ve been, and it shows in her diary.

The paperback that I read was given by a friend many years ago (above picture). Reading while listening gave me an extra insight into the different versions of the diary. According to the introduction of the audio book, there are sort of 3 different versions of the book. To simplify, my paperback is an edited version of the diary, while the audio book contains extra content.

You might already know that Anne Frank, her mother, and sister, and in fact everyone living in the secret annex did not survive, except for Anne’s father. The father found the diary after the war ended, and published it eventually as a book. In the first version he did edit out some parts that have anything to do with sex talks, and those that criticize or speak harshly about Anne’s mother in particular. The translations of the two editions are also slightly different, and I think the new translation is superior – more reason to choose the 70th anniversary edition.

Though some parts of the diary might be a bit boring than others, I’m thinking it’s impossible to read this book on its own merits, outside the context it is written in. It is an extraordinary testimony of a time and place, and of the life of a young girl living in it. There are millions of Jews suffered and died in that period, but there’s only one diary that survives and lives. Surely that speaks volume. Anne was articulate, witty, and thoughtful. She spoke of the future. I dreaded every chapter, the closer I came to the end, because I knew what awaits. Knowing the ending, I was slightly surprised how incredibly sad I was at the end. The diary ended abruptly, and the afterword gave a brief closure to the fate of everyone in the secret annex. I could hardly sleep the first night, and I thought about Anne for days afterwards. The thing that hit me the most is that they all died alone, away from each other, in stark contrast from living together in such close quarter for a long period of time. Dying alone seems the worst. It’s too sad, I have no word for it.

On a somewhat brighter note, Anne achieved what she wanted:

“I want to get on; I can’t imagine that I would have to lead the same sort of life as Mummy and Mrs Van Daan and all the women who do their work and are then forgotten. I must have something besides a husband and children, something that I can devote myself to! I want to go on living even after my death! And therefore I am grateful to God for giving me this gift, this possibility of developing myself and of writing, of expressing all that is in me.”

And so does she go on living after her death. She’s been immortalized through her diary and people from all over the world reading her writing. If only she knew..

Mee’s rating: 5/5

 

 

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