A Room with a View – E. M. Forster

room with a view  emforster

A Room with a View was published in 1908, and my copy is the above beautiful Penguin English Library edition. I read this following the Edx course with BerkeleyX Book Club. BerkeleyX has focused on a few books for their book club programme, but this is the first time when the timing was right for me. It doesn’t quite work like traditional book club – at least not for me – as I found the discussion thread format a bit clunky and not easy to view (This is however on the hands of Edx, not BerkeleyX), so I didn’t join any conversation. But I like how the course provides background information for the book.

The first third of the book is set in Florence, Italy – and this setting is a crucial part in building the story. The protagonist is Lucy, a young English girl who is on holiday in Florence with her chaperone, a (much) older cousin. In a pension (inn) full of English abroad, Lucy meets father and son pair, who are deemed by many of their fellow English to be too brash. But deep inside Lucy holds a different opinion, and finds their direct personality refreshing. In fact it is more than that as she starts to fall for the son, George..

(On a side note, Lucy seems a favorite name for young naive girl in that period of England. It reminds me of Lucy in Dracula. Lucy this, Lucy that. Poor Lucy. Everybody seems to always tell Lucy what to do.)

The contrast of Italy and England settings is emphasised, as in the second part of the book we are back in England, where stuffiness is paramount, where things always have to be proper, and Lucy is engaged to a man who she thinks is right. The contrast is played quite obviously throughout the book: Italy vs England, holiday time vs real life, the lively guy who isn’t quite “the right sort” vs the serious man who is, and of course, heart vs mind. In its essence though A Room with a View is a love story, so I think it’s better if one is prepared for that from the beginning (I was).

This is my first time reading E. M. Forster, and I’m not quite sure yet whether I could connect with his writing. There’s some humour in A Room with a View, but I always caught it a few seconds too late. (one.. two.. “Aah.. it’s a joke..” late smile..) I like the sound of his other books, such as A Passage to India and Maurice, or even Howards End. So I can see at least reading another one of his books before deciding whether he’s for me or not.

Mee’s rating: 4/5

A Room with A View – the movie (1985)

Room_with_a_View film

I watched the movie straight after the book and it was fabulous. I probably liked the movie more than the book. A lovely Merchant Ivory production, it features impressive casts, including young Helena Bonham Carter as Lucy, Maggie Smith as the older cousin, and Judi Dench even made a small appearance. The male actors however, seem to have sunk into obscurity since then? I don’t know any of them.

The biggest surprise for me was Helena Bonham Carter, whose younger self I had never seen prior to this movie. She was so sweet looking then (as opposed to her charisma today as a gothic looking woman). Now I’d really like to see more of her old films.

The film won 3 Oscars in 1987 for Best Writing by Ruth Prawer Jhabvala (one of the Merchant Ivory trio), Best Art Direction, and Best Costume Design, and received nominations for Best Picture (Ismail Merchant), Best Director (James Ivory), Best Actor, Best Supporting Actress (Maggie Smith), and Best Cinematography. Very critically acclaimed it seems. Worth watching.

Mee’s rating: 8/10

 

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