Light in August – Faulkner / The Old Man and the Sea – Hemingway

The Fiction of Relationship course on Coursera is starting again 1 September this year, so I picked up steam to continue reading on the second part of the course, which has the following list of books: (I finished the first part of the course last year)

From all books in the list, I had been dreading William Faulkner the most. It was one of the reason that I got stuck on the first part of the course (ending with To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf). But with much trepidation, I finally picked up Light in August.

Light in August by William Faulkner

light in august - faulkner

Light in August is largely a story of Joe Christmas, a person who thinks that he might be black. As you can guess from that sentence, much of the book is about racism, what it means to be white, and what it means to be black, in that area of the US at that period of time. I’m not familiar with what’s so called Southern literature, so I had little clues about what the society and the rules at the time are like. At the beginning of the book, I was quite confused about who was white and who was black — while in any other novels set in other period of time these might be inconsequential, in this book it DOES matter. People who are more familiar with the culture would pick up the clues pretty quickly (from the way people talk and how they interact, e.g. the whites and the blacks almost never interact unless absolutely necessary and their difference in classes would be clearly shown), but it really took me a while.

I read Faulkner’s short story before (Pantaloon in Black), but this is the first time I read his novel. From what I read, Light in August sounds like one of his most accessible novels. The style is stream of consciousness, which somewhat reminded me of Woolf’s To the Lighthouse, and the writing is amazing – there were many jaw-dropping moments for me, as I could not believe someone could come up with such brilliant sentences. Faulkner was a revelation to me. It is really worth it to push out of your comfort zone every once in a while, and opens new world.

Amongst the brilliance though, there were also many confusing passages. I can’t say I understood everything 100%, but it was a good experience (and lectures from Prof Weinstein helped a lot). I won’t be rushing to read more Faulkner soon, but I’m sure I will read more in the future.

Mee’s Rating: 4/5

The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway

the old man and the sea - hemingway

In similar fashion with Faulkner, I read both Hemingway’s and Faulkner’s short stories last year, but this is the first time I read Hemingway’s novel. The Old Man and the Sea is a novella of 99 pages, and it’s short and enjoyable enough for me to recommend it if you’ve never read Hemingway.

In similar fashion as Big Two-Hearted River, one of Hemingway’s most popular short stories I read last year, The Old Man and the Sea largely revolves around a man fishing. Fishing is something that is so far off from my world, that probably like a lot of you I wondered whether I would enjoy reading about it at all. I didn’t quite like Big Two-Hearted River — it was way too quiet and the type of story in which nothing is happening: a man goes fishing and reminisces about the time before the war. The Old Man and the Sea is a more happening story, though still has lots of fishing. This time in the sea. Also the fish is much bigger. I have not read Moby Dick, but I have an inkling that there are similarities, in that The Old Man is obsessed about catching the Big Fish and getting it home, in the similar fashion as Ahab obsessing about catching the whale. There is also the whole struggle between man and nature.

People mention how masculine Hemingway’s books are, and I somewhat agree, but was surprised to find a touch of much vulnerability and sensitivity in one of the characters in the book. The old man is poor and has nobody to care for him, but there is a boy who adores him and fetches food for him, and goes to him even though his parents disapprove. He cries when he sees the old man suffering. I was really touched by this boy character in the book, and felt like I saw the vulnerability and sensitivity of the author himself. Based on this, I will read more of Hemingway’s books in the future before deciding what I feel about his works. I’ve got Fiesta: The Sun Also Rises on my shelf.

Mee’s Rating: 3.5/5

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3 thoughts on “Light in August – Faulkner / The Old Man and the Sea – Hemingway”

  1. This looks like an interesting but very challenging reading list! I’ve never had that much interest in Faulkner, but your description actually makes me think I might be interested in giving him a try at some point. Your perspective on the racial identities is very interesting.

    I wasn’t really a fan of The Old Man and the Sea, though I can’t remember specifically why, other than a lack of interest in fishing! I do think I ought to try reading something else by Hemmingway eventually.

    1. If you want to try Faulkner, I do recommend Light in August.

      I remember losing interest too at various points in The Old Man and the Sea. Lucky it’s such a short book!

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